National Sleep Foundation

Chapter 4: Primary Hypersomnias

Etiology and Risk Factors

Idiopathic hypersomnia appears to have a genetic component, as 50% to 60% of cases are familial. Women may be at greater risk; a preponderance among female patients has been found in some, but not all, series.  Metabolic data “suggest the possibility of a dysfunction of aminergic arousal systems in idiopathic hypersomnia.”74

Because there are idiopathic hypersomnia and narcolepsy share overlapping features, there is some interest in exploring the role of human leukocyte antigen (HLA) markers for idiopathic hypersomnia. “Despite reports of an increase in HLA DQ1,8 DR5 and Cw2, and DQ3 and of a decrease of Cw3, no consistent findings have emerged. HLA typing currently does not play a role in the diagnosis of idiopathic hypersomnia.”75

References

  1. Bassetti C, and Y Dauvilliers, “Idiopathic Hypersomnia,” In: Kryger MH, Roth T III, Dement WC, eds. Principles and Practice of Sleep Medicine (5th edition), Philadelphia, Pa: Elsevier Saunders; 2011: 970.
  2. Bassetti C, and Y Dauvilliers, “Idiopathic Hypersomnia,” In: Kryger MH, Roth T III, Dement WC, eds. Principles and Practice of Sleep Medicine (5th edition), Philadelphia, Pa: Elsevier Saunders; 2011:969-979.