National Sleep Foundation

Chapter 6: Parasomnias

Prevalence of NREM Sleep Arousal Disorders

Some Non-Rapid Eye Movement (NREM) Sleep Arousal Disorders are more prevalent in childhood and tend to diminish with age; these include sleep-walking, night-terrors, and confusional arousal.

The prevalence of confusional arousals among 15 to 24-year-olds is 6 percent; among individuals over age 65, prevalence is 1 percent1.

The prevalence of sleep-walking among children is as much as 40 percent; 2 to 3 percent of children sleepwalk more than once a month. Among adults, the prevalence of sleep-walking is between 2 and 3 percent2.

The prevalence of sleep terrors is between 1 – 7 percent in children; among adults, the prevalence is 2 percent3

The prevalence of sleep sex (sexsomnia) is between 3 – 4 percent of adults4.  

The prevalence of Sleep-Related Eating Disorder (SRED) is about 1 to 5 percent of the adult population5.  SRED usually occurs in the context of other sleep disorders. Sixty percent of afflicted individuals have an arousal disorder (mainly confusional arousals); others have Restless Leg Syndrome (RLS), or Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome (OSAS)6.  Increased rates of SRED have also been found in psychiatric populations and those using hypnotic medications. One study reported that SRED was experienced by 37 percent of patients with mood disorders, 24 percent of those with a prior history of substance abuse, and 18 percent of those with anxiety disorders7.

 

Reference

  1. Markov D, Jaffe F, Doghramji K, MD, “Update on Parasomnias: A Review for Psychiatric Practice,” Psychiatry (Edgmont). 2006 Jul; 3(7): 69–76. Published online 2006 Jul. PMCID: PMC2958868
  2. Markov D, Jaffe F, Doghramji K, MD, “Update on Parasomnias: A Review for Psychiatric Practice,” Psychiatry (Edgmont). 2006 Jul; 3(7): 69–76. Published online 2006 Jul. PMCID: PMC2958868
  3. Markov D, Jaffe F, Doghramji K, MD, “Update on Parasomnias: A Review for Psychiatric Practice,” Psychiatry (Edgmont). 2006 Jul; 3(7): 69–76. Published online 2006 Jul. PMCID: PMC2958868
  4. Ohayon MM, Guilleminault C, Priest RG, Night terrors, sleepwalking, and confusional arousals in the general population: their frequency and relationship to other sleep and mental disorders. J Clin Psychiatry. 1999 Apr;60(4):268-76.
  5. Markov D, Jaffe F, Doghramji K, MD, “Update on Parasomnias: A Review for Psychiatric Practice,” Psychiatry (Edgmont). 2006 Jul; 3(7): 69–76. Published online 2006 Jul. PMCID: PMC2958868
  6. Schenck CH, Hurwitz TD, Bundlie SR, Mahowald MW. Sleep-related eating disorders: polysomnographic correlates of a heterogeneous syndrome distinct from daytime eating disorders. Sleep. 1991;14:419-431.
  7. Winkelman JW, Herzog DB, Fava M. The prevalence of sleep-related eating disorder in psychiatric and non-psychiatric populations. Psychological Medicine. 1999;29:1461-1466.